4 Modern Milking Parlor Designs

Posted by Susan Allen, M. Ed.

Wednesday, December 13, 2017

Tags: Milk Production

We all know milk comes from cows. Some of us even think chocolate milk comes from brown cows. All jokes aside, how does the milk get from cows to our table?

“That’s easy!” you say. “You squeeze the udder and milk comes out!” And while milk is released from the udder by a gentle squeezing motion, the days of pulling up a stool and breathing on your hands to warm them up before embarking on a tedious, yet rewarding task are long behind us.

These days, more efficient machines and sometimes robots provide relief to the hands of farmers around the country. Dairy farmers use different milking equipment depending on how many cows they milk, how many times a day they milk, the cost of machinery and their personal preference. It’s not just the equipment that has changed either; the way dairies are designed has also changed since the days when each farmer had just one cow.

On a dairy farm, the place where the milking magic happens is called a “parlor.” Milking parlors, like cows, come in all different shapes and sizes. Farmers put a lot of thought and effort into the design of this space, and it’s not so much about feng shui as it is about functionality.

Here are the four main designs of milking parlors used by dairy farmers.

1. Parallel

As the name suggests, cows stand parallel to each other in this design. So, if the cows are standing side to side, that only leaves one access point for the milker to reach the udder: the rear end! In parallel parlors, milking doesn’t begin until all cows are in their stalls, and they are all released from the parlor at one time.

 

Parallel Parlor

2. Tandem

Tandem parlor designs are not all that dissimilar to tandem bikes, in that the cows stand nose-to-tail inside individual stalls. This gives the milker a side-on vantage point of the udder. Cows can be released one at a time, too, so if one cow is moving a little slowly, all her friends don’t have to wait for her to finish.

 

Tandem Parlor

3. Herringbone

Herringbone parlors are the most common design used on dairy farms with smaller herds. The cattle stand at a 45-degree angle. This design offers the milker a different access point to the udder than the parallel or tandem designs, and also allows access for different types of equipment to be used.

 

Herringbone Parlor

4. Rotary

Rotary parlors are like carousel rides for dairy cows. The milking stalls are arranged in a large circle on a platform that rotates slowly. Cows can walk in, and depending on the size of the platform, finish milking by the time they’ve completed a lap or two. Rather than the milker having to walk around the parlor to attach the milking equipment to each udder, they can stay in one place and let the cows come to them!

 

Rotary Parlor

Sometimes people think cows are milked 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. While a dairy operates 24/7, cows are milked two or three times every day, and it only takes about 7 to15 minutes each milking, depending on the cow and the system.

No matter which parlor design, rest assured the cow’s udder is always washed clean before the milking machine is attached. That wholesome, nutrient-rich milk is never touched by human hands, is tested multiple times for impurities, is safely pasteurized at a processor, and reaches you safe and cold within two days.

Susan Allen, M. Ed.

View more posts by the author

Add new comment

(If you're a human, don't change the following field)
(If you're a human, don't change the following field)